World Alzheimer’s Month is observed every September as a global health campaign to bring awareness and understanding of the difference between dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. The Alzheimer’s Association states, “Though the greatest known risk factor for Alzheimer’s is increasing age, the disease is not a normal part of aging. And though most people with Alzheimer’s are 65 and older, approximately 200,000 Americans under 65 have younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease.”

How is Alzheimer’s different from dementia?
Dementia is an overall term for a decline in memory, emotion, and mental abilities – enough that it interrupts daily life. Dementia is caused by disease, stroke, reactions to medications, or other types of damage to brain cells. Alzheimer’s is a disease and the most common type of dementia.

Ten Warning Signs of Dementia include:

  • Memory Loss
  • Problems with language
  • Difficulty completing familiar tasks
  • Confusion with time or place
  • Misplacing things
  • Withdrawal from work or social activities
  • Changes in mood or personality
  • Having trouble with images and spatial relationships

Alzheimer’s disease eventually gets worse over time and while there are medications to slow the progression, there is no cure. Support and care are the main goals to improve the lives of those living with dementia and their families. For more information on finding a local Alzheimer’s chapter and additional resources in your area, visit here.

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